Photo Friday—Nancy Chandler

Nancy Frances Jolly Chandler.

Nancy Frances Jolly was born in South Carolina on 14 Apr 1811. On 20 Jan 1831, she was apparently living in Franklin County, Georgia, and married Dudley Jones Chandler, also of Franklin County.

By 1840, they removed to Pocataligo, Madison County, Georgia, where they resided for the remainder of their lives.

According to a newspaper article published in The Constitution marking Dudley’s 90th birthday, they had sixteen children. [1]

Nancy and Dudley are interred at the McGinnis Cemetery in Madison County, Georgia.

T. J. Allen, the photographer of this portrait, arrived in Harmony Grove, now Commerce, Jackson County, Georgia, in about 1889, and was the principal photographer there for thirty years. [2]


Nancy Frances Jolly (1811–1887) is 5th great-grandmother of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

Dudley Jones Chandler (1809–1905) is 5th great-grandfather of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

References:
[1] “His Ninetieth Birthday,” The Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia), 13 Aug 1899, p. 4.
[2] History of Harmony Grove-Commerce, Chapter 20, The USGenWeb Archives Project.

Source: Ancestry.com member Leita Cowart (photograph).

Twenty-Fourth Census of the United States

Stanley G. Wetherbee, 1910 United States Federal Census enumerator, Fairmount Township, Richland County, North Dakota.

Beginning today, households across the United States will receive U.S. Census Bureau mail detailing how to respond to the 2020 Census—the 24th Census of the United States.

To mark this important occasion, we jump back to 15 Apr 1910—the beginning of the 13th Census of the United States. Our Stanley Wetherbee served as the enumerator for Fairmount Township (pop. 320), Fairmount Village (pop. 387), and LaMars Township (pop. 287), Richland County, North Dakota.

In 1910, enumerators were hired through the civil service system after a prolonged disagreement between Congress (favoring patronage positions) and President Theodore Roosevelt (favoring civil service positions).

Stanley visited households in Fairmount Township from 18 Apr to 25 Apr, Fairmount Village from 26 Apr to 3 May, and LaMars Township from 4 May to 7 May. He may have taken 24 Apr off. So he enumerated 994 persons over 19 days, about 52 persons per day.

Stanley appears to have made one mistake though. He seems to have forgotten to visit his own family. In 1910, Stanley was likely still living with his parents Homer and Florence Wetherbee, and his four younger brothers. We have looked high and low, far and wide—there is no Homer Wetherbee family in the 1910 US Census. So North Dakota’s population was not 577,056, but instead 577,063.

Under the 72-year rule, the National Archives and Records Administration will release the original 2020 US Census returns to the public in 2092. Until then, only statistical reports that do not identify individuals will be released. Genealogists will have to wait.


Stanley George Wetherbee (1890–1971) is 2nd great-uncle of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Photo Friday—Stella and Kate Hines

Stella and Kate Hines, from Hazel Porter’s photo album.

Stella Ludelia Hines and Mary Catherine (Kate) Hines are the daughters of David and Lydia Hines, and the granddaughters of George and Sarah Hinds.

This portrait is from the photo album of Hazel May Porter. The portrait was taken by Pioneer Studio of Blackduck, Minnesota, likely after 1902 as we will see. The handwritten notation on verso, presumably by Hazel, is:

Stella Hines
Aunt Kate Hines

Their brother David Wellington Hines married Catherine Barbara Adams, daughter of Alpheus James Adams and Ellen Jane Hannah.

About 1826, George, Sarah, and children emigrated from Suffolk, England, to East Gwillimbury, York County, Canada West. David and Lydia’s children were born in Simcoe County, Canada West. Canada West became Ontario, Canada, at Canadian Confederation on 1 Jul 1867.

Their family name is spelled Hindes or Hinds in English records. In Canada and the U.S., it is variously spelled Hindes, Hinds, or Hines, with Hines being more prevalent in later records.

Kate married her 1st cousin William M. Hines in 1890. William had earlier removed to the U.S. around 1883, and Kate did as well in 1889. They apparently were in North Dakota for some time, as their first child, Olive, was born there in Dec 1892. By 1900, William and Kate removed to Blackduck, Beltrami County, Minnesota.

Stella removed to Blackduck in 1902, and married Arthur B. Page in 1903.

While reviewing and updating our family tree for Stella and Kate, we ran across this second portrait on Ancestry.com. Stella and Kate clearly remembered their pose from the earlier portrait, but forgot their hats!

Stella and Kate Hines, from Ancestry.com member pamelaasmith.

Stella Ludelia Hines (1881-1964) is sister-in-law of 3rd great-aunt of MKS in the Watne branch.

Mary Catherine Hines (1866-1952) is sister-in-law of 3rd great-aunt of MKS in the Watne branch.

Source: Ancestry.com member pamelaasmith (second photograph).

Finding Anna Belle Foster’s Father

Our tree on the Christian (Spratlin maternal) branch is broad and deep, seven or eight generations deep on every line, except for a single, late brick wall—the father of Anna Belle Foster.

Anna Belle Foster, likely born 3 Mar 1882 in Clarke County, Georgia, is the daughter of Eliza E. Bray, and the 2nd great-grandmother of MKS.

Eliza E. Bray married Juan F. Foster on 3 Sep 1874 in Clarke County, Georgia. We have only found five records that closely bracket Anna Belle’s birth and shed light on Eliza’s family:

  • 1874 marriage license and marriage record for Juan and Eliza
  • 1880 US Census for Juan and Eliza
  • Property Tax Digest for Danielsville, Madison County, Georgia, 1878–1882, for Juan
  • 1900 US Census for Eliza
  • 1910 US Census for Eliza

Eliza had three daughters: Rosa Foster, Harriet Foster, and Anna Belle Foster. Rosa and Harriet predeceased Eliza, who died on 4 Mar 1919.

In the 1880 US Census for Athens, Clarke County, Georgia, Juan is listed with Eliza, Rosa, and Eliza’s niece Cornelia E. Bray. Juan is listed as age 25, birthplace Georgia. That Anna Belle is not listed supports that she was indeed born after 1880.

Eliza and Juan apparently divorced before 1900, and Eliza then married William Jasper Bradberry after 1900 and before 1910.

Juan F. Foster—that is not a typical Southern name of that era. But his name is spelled that way clearly and consistently in the three records that list him. We have been unable to find any records for Juan prior to 1874.

With the dearth of records for Eliza’s family, the loss of the 1890 US Census (Fire!) is particularly detrimental to our research.

So here is the real problem. We have DNA kits for a grandson and several great-grandchildren of Anna Belle, making them a great-grandson and several 2nd great-grandchildren of Eliza, and presumably Juan. There may be no other records for Juan, but we should be able to find some DNA matches for these kits through Juan’s ancestors.

The probability Anne Belle’s grandson shares a DNA segment with someone that is an actual cousin through a common ancestor in Juan’s line is:

Common AncestorMatch Relationship
to Grandson
%
Great-Grandparents5C32
Grandparents4C71
Parents3C98
Juan and Eliza2C100

Unless Juan is from a multi-generational line of only children, far from the norm of around eight children per family, we’d expect to find many DNA matches through Juan’s ancestors back through at least his great-grandparents. We don’t.

Here is what we do find for Anna Belle’s grandson’s DNA matches.

Spratlin-Christian DNA cluster diagram, minimum 55 cM.

We clearly see large clusters for three of the four sets of great-grandparents—Spratlin-Crow, O’Kelly-Chandler, and Christian-Moore. And we see two small clusters in the lower right—Bray and Guest.

Guest? Who is Guest? As we lower the cM threshold and look at matches through more distant common ancestors, we find many more Guest matches, many with trees containing a Guest line extending back several generations before our time period of interest. By looking for shared matches through the spouses in this Guest line, we quickly develop a hypothesis for the parents of Anna Belle’s father—Sanford Guest and Frances Salina Stone.

We have at least 7 shared matches through Sanford and Frances, all with shared DNA amounts consistent with the hypothesis. We also have at least 20 shared matches through his parents and grandparents, and 32 through her parents and grandparents.

Eliza, age 23, lived with her parents in 1870 in Militia District 6, Banks County, Georgia, served by the Phi Delta Post Office.

In 1870, Sanford, Frances, two daughters, four sons, and another male Guest, age 17, of unknown relationship, lived in Washington, Banks County, served by the Nails Creek Post Office.

Map of Banks County, Georgia, 1883.

Phi Delta to Nails Creek—8 miles. This is where we invoke Gibbs’ Rule #39.

Sanford and Frances had five sons, born between 1846 and 1859. The first son apparently died before 1860. The other four all lived beyond 1920. It is likely one of these four is the father of Anna Belle.

The records and available DNA kits do not tell us any more at this point.


Anna Belle Foster (1882–1952) is 2nd great-grandmother of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

Eliza E. Bray (1846–1919) is mother of Anna Belle Foster, and 3rd great-grandmother of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

Juan F. Foster (1856–unk) is husband of Eliza E. Bray.

Sanford Guest (1818–1896) and Frances Salina Stone (1820–1897) are likely grandparents of Anna Belle Foster, and 4th great-grandparents of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

William Jasper Bradberry (1849–1930) is husband of Eliza E. Bray.

Photo Friday—George and Sarepta Bragg

George Washington Bragg and Sarepta Jane Christian Bragg, bef. 1921.

Sarepta Jane Christian was born in Bowman, Elbert County, Georgia, the daughter of John Washington Christian and Lucy Ann Moore. She was raised there, and in 1892, married George Washington Bragg.

They continued to live in Elbert County, where 2 daughters and 4 sons were born.

They removed to DeKalb County by 1910, and Atlanta, Georgia, by 1912, before removing to Basalt, Bingham County, Idaho, by 1920.

According to the US Censuses, George was a farmer in Georgia. In Idaho, he was a laborer with a steam railroad.

George and Sarepta are interred at the Firth Cemetery in Firth, Bingham County, Idaho.


Sarepta Jane Christian (1867-1955) is 3rd great-aunt of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

George Washington Bragg (1857-1921) is husband of Sarepta Jane Christian.

Source: Ancestry.com member Kenneth Polito (photograph).

Sisley Jordan Farrar—Ancient Planter

A fragment of a gold finger ring (top) and the decorated end of a silver bodkin, both from Jordan’s Journey. [1]

Sisley (NN) Jordan Farrar is our family’s earliest known arrival in America—Aug 1611, Jamestowne, Colony of Virginia.

Below is Sisley’s biography from Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635: A Biographical Dictionary [2], interspersed with additional context and discussion of the original sources for her biography.

In the original sources, Sisley’s given name is spelled several ways including Cecily, Sisley, and Sysley. We use Sisley, the variant listed in two censuses taken during her adulthood, unless quoting a source.

The gold finger ring and silver bodkin above were recovered during excavation within the palisade fortification at Jordan’s Journey—archaeological site 44PG302—Sisley’s home. The ring was found within feature F-431 indicated on the artifacts map.


On January 21, 1625, Cisley Jordan (Jordain, Jorden, Jerden), an ancient planter, reported that she had arrived in Virginia in August 1610 on the Swan. As she was 24 years old in 1625, she would have been around 9 or 10 years old when she came to the colony.

Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635

The Swan, a vessel in Sir Thomas Gates’ fleet, sailed from England in May 1611 via the West Indies, and actually arrived in Aug 1611, not Aug 1610. [3] More than 13 years later, Sisley is reporting her arrival in “Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia, 1624/5” [4], which explains the mistake in the reported year.

“She may have been accompanied by her parents, for Gates’ ships brought some 300 men, women, and children to the colony.” [1] Her maiden name and parents are lost to us.

Gate’s fleet was the 6th group of colonists to arrive in Jamestowne. Sisley had the good fortune of not traveling in the first four groups. Of the 600–700 colonists in these four groups arriving between 1607–1609, only about 60 were still living after the Starving Time in the winter of 1609–1610. The group that included Sisley increased the population of colonists in America above 1,000 for the first time. [3]

Cisley may have wed ancient planter John Bayley and produced a daughter, Temperance, who was age 7 in January 1625 and living in her home. It is certain that Cisley married ancient planter Samuel Jordan sometime prior to December 21, 1620, when he received his first dividend of land, which also included her entitlement as an ancient planter.

The Jordans took up residence on the lower side of the James River at a plantation they called Jordan’s Journey. After the March 22, 1622, Indian attack, the Jordan plantation was strengthened and became a rallying point for the area’s survivors.

Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635

Samuel and Cecily Jordan are listed as ancient planters in a 10 Dec 1620 land grant for 450 acres. [6]

Ancient planter is a term applied by the Virginia Company of London to colonists who arrived in Virginia prior to 1616, remained three years, and paid their own passage. After 1618, these colonists received a dividend of 100 acres of land each, the first land grants in Virginia. [7]

Sisley is listed in both “A List of Names; of the Living in Virginia; february the 16 1623[/4]” [5] and “Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia, 1624/5” [4] at Jordan’s Journey with Mary Jordan, Margery/Margrett Jordan, and Temperance Baylife/Baley. Mary and Margaret are Samuel and Sisley’s daughters. From this, it is inferred that Sisley married a Baley (Bailey, Bayley), and was widowed, before marrying Samuel Jordan. Interestingly, Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635, does not mention this marriage between John Bayley and Sisley in its biographies for John Bailey and Temperance Bayley.

Cisley Jordan was widowed sometime after April 1623, and on November 19, 1623, she was authorized to settle her late husband’s estate, with the help of William Farrar. Farrar, who at the time of the Indian attack had been occupying a plantation on the east side of the Appomattox River, somewhat inland from Bermuda Hundred, may have taken refuge at Jordan’s Journey and stayed on.

On January 21, 1625, when a muster was made of Jordans Journey’s inhabitants, Cisley Jordan and William Farrar were listed as jointly heading a Jordan’s Journey household that included her daughters Mary and Margaret Jordan, Temperance Bayley, and 10 male servants.

By May 1625 Cisley and William Farrar had wed. Probate records indicate that they produced at least three children: Cecily, William, and John.

Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635

William Farrar died before 1637. Sisley is believed to have died after William, but the year is unknown.


Sisley is our Jamestowne Society Qualifying Ancestor (A9447). [8] The Jamestowne Society application lineage data is available in the membership only area.

What roles did Samuel Jordan and William Farrar play in the Colony of Virginia?

In July-August 1619 Samuel Jordan was one of two men who represented the corporation of Charles City in Virginia’s first legislative assembly.

In March 1626 William Farrar was named to the Council of State, and later in the year he was designated a commissioner of the monthly courts for the ‘Upper Parts,’ held at Jordan’s Journey and Shirley Hundred, to settle petty disputes in the communities west of Flowerdew Hundred.

Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607–1635

Sisley NN (1600–1637) is 11th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Samuel Jordan (1578–1623) is husband of 11th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

William Farrar (1583–1637) is 11th great-grandfather of MKS in the Knight branch.

References:
[1] Martha W. McCartney, Jordan’s Point, Virginia, Archaeology in Perspective, Prehistoric to Modern Times (Richmond, Virginia: University of Virginia Press, 2011).
[2] Martha W. McCartney, Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2007), 433-434.
[3] Wikipedia, “Jamestown supply missions.”
[4] John Camden Hotten, “Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia, 1624/5,” The Original Lists of Persons of Quality (London: John Camden Hotten, 1874), 209-210.
[5] John Camden Hotten, “A List of Names; of the Living in Virginia; february the 16 1623[/4],” The Original Lists of Persons of Quality (London: John Camden Hotten, 1874), 171.
[6] “Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants Index,” Patents No. 8, 1689-1695, 125-127.
[7] Wikipedia, “Ancient planter.”
[8] “Qualifying Ancestors, Sisley ( ) Jordan,” jamestowne.org.

Facts and Events—Levels of Confidence

As our genealogy skills have developed, particularly over the last year, we are more often documenting our level of confidence in the facts and events we add to our family tree, or discuss in our posts here or in other documents we author.

There are many terms we could use to express our level of confidence, and many schemes to rank these terms relative to each other. No point in reinventing the wheel, though.

After purchasing a copy of Elizabeth Shown Mills’ Evidence Explained [1], we chose to adopt the hierarchy of terms presented there in Section 1.6 Levels of Confidence.


Certainly: The author has no reasonable doubt about the assertion, based upon sound research and good evidence.

Probably: The author feels the assertion is more likely than not, based upon sound research and good evidence.

Likely: The author feels some evidence supports the assertion, but the assertion is far from proved.

Possibly: The author feels the odds weight at least slightly in favor of the assertion.

Apparently: The author has formed an impression or presumption, typically based upon common experience, but has not tested the matter.

Perhaps: The author suggests that an idea is plausible, although it remains to be tested.


Being more mathematically and visually inclined, here is how we tend to apply these terms in our own use.

We usually keep possibly and apparently to ourselves until we have done a little more research.

When we estimate an individual’s birth year, based on a parent’s, spouse’s, or child’s birth year, we indicate this with, for example, “Estimate, based on her mother’s Birth.”

We assume the mother is 3 years younger than the father, and the mother is 22, 31, and 40 years old at the birth of their first, middle, and last child. These average ages were found in a reference that we unfortunately failed to record at the time. The reference though was for 1600–1900 America when the economy was largely agriculture-based.

And, if we copy something from someone else’s tree to preserve it until we have time to look at it, we now attach a source entitled “(copied from the internet; no source provided)”—copy these at your own risk!


References:
[1] Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained, Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, Third Edition, Revised (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2017), 19-20.

Rev. Ezra Adams—Methodist Episcopal Circuit Rider

In the hard and cruel life of the border, with its grim struggle against the forbidding forces of wild nature and wilder men, there was much to pull the frontiersman down. If left to himself, without moral teaching and moral guidance, without any of the influences that tend toward the uplifting of man and the subduing of the brute within him, sad would have been his, and therefore our, fate. From this fate we have been largely rescued by the fact that together with the rest of the pioneers went the pioneer preachers; and all honor be given to the Methodists for the great proportion of these pioneer preachers whom they furnished.

Theodore Roosevelt, 26 Feb 1903, at the bi-centennial celebration of the birth of John Wesley

For over half a century, “the whole powers of (Rev. Ezra Adams’) mind were absorbed in the great work of saving souls” on the Canadian frontier. [1]

The Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in the United States in 1784. As the country expanded west, the Church expanded with it. Conferences, many aligned with one or more states, and comprised of several districts, were organized to direct its activity over an area. Districts of the New York Conference initially covered Canada. In 1810, the districts covering northern-most New York and Canada were organized into the Genesee Conference. In 1824, the districts covering Canada were organized again into the Canada Conference.

Each Conference met in Annual Conference—usually in the late summer, presumably for ease of travel. As the members of the Annual Conference were the itinerant preachers, Ezra presumably traveled from Canada to some of these conferences in northern New York between 1814–1824.

At the Annual Conference, the Conference bishop assigned itinerant preachers to a circuit for the next year. From the minutes of these conferences, it appears the preachers left the Annual Conference, and immediately headed to their newly assigned circuit.

Beginning in 1824, the Canada Conference severed ties with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1833 joined with the British Wesleyans to form the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Ezra would have then no longer traveled to the United States, instead attending Annual Conferences with the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada.

Circuit riding was difficult and dangerous work. Large numbers of them retired or died early. Ezra was designated superannuated three times during his career, and again at the end of his career.

“Superannuated Preachers are ministers in the Methodist churches who, by reason of age, infirmity, or afflictions, are disabled from preaching, but remain members of the Annual Conferences.” [2]

Ezra’s assigned stations are listed below. [1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] The dates are from Annual Conference (late summer) to subsequent Annual Conference. Over his career, his circuits spanned 500 miles of southern Ontario, Canada, as far east as Ottawa, and as far west as Lake St. Clair (near Detroit). Here, we find the townships were his children were born, and where they met their future spouses. And we observe that he probably named his third child William Case Adams after Rev. William Case.

Methodist Episcopal Church (USA), Upper or Lower Canada District
1814–1815Traveled under direction of a Presiding Elder or Chairman, perhaps Presiding Elder Rev. William Case; Ancaster circuit
1815–1816Admitted on trial into the ministry; Bay of Quinte circuit
1816–discontinued for a year “for want of health”
1817–1818Hallowell circuit
1818–1820Ottawa circuit;
ordained as Deacon in 1819
1820–1822Thames circuit
1822–1824Niagara circuit
1824Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada formed
1824–superannuated in Esquesing, now Acton; “worn down by disease incurred in the swamps of the western country”
1827–mentions Rev. E. Adams’ school-house (Acton)
1830–1831“restored to a seat in the Conference”; Yonge Street circuit
1831–1833Presiding Elder of London District; also missionary to Munceytown Mission, Indian reserve on Thames River
1833–1835Muncey Mission, Indian reserve on Thames River
1834–1835Munceytown and Delaware Missions; as Presiding Elder’s Assistant, also “visited Gosfield and Thames circuits occasionally”
1835–1836Prescott and Augusta circuit
1836–1837Prescott and Augusta circuit, superannuated
1837–1840Nelson circuit, superannuated
1840–1841Toronto circuit
1841–1842Guelph circuit
1842–1845Newmarket circuit
1845–1847Markham circuit
1847–1848Bradford circuit
1848–1849Stratford and Peel circuit
1849–1864Peel circuit, superannuated
1864–1868Drayton circuit, superannuated
1868–1871records not found
1871–Peel circuit

Rev. Ezra Adams (1788–1871) is 5th great-grandfather of MKS in the Watne branch.

References:
[1] John Carroll, Case and His Contempories: Or, The Canadian Itinerant’s Memorial: Constituting a Biographical History of Methodism in Canada, From Its Introduction Into the Province, Till the Death of the Rev. Wm. Case in 1855, 5 vols. [I, II, III, IV, V] (Toronto: Samuel Rose, at the Wesleyan Printing Establishment, 1867-1877).
[2] “Superannuated Preachers“, McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia.
[3] George H. Cornish, Hand-Book of Canadian Methodism, Being An Alphabetical Arrangement … (Toronto: Wesleyan Printing, 1867).
[4] Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church for the Years 1773–1828 (New York: T. Mason and G.Lane, for the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1840).
[5] The Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Wesleyan-Methodist Church in Canada, from 1824–1845, Inclusive … (Toronto: Anson Green, Conference Office, 1846).
[6] The Minutes of the Twelve Annual Conferences of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, from 1846–1857 inclusive … (Toronto: Anson Green, Conference Office, 1863).
[7] George F. Playter, The History of Methodism in Canada: With an Account of the Rise and Progress of the Work of God Among the Canadian Indian Tribes, and Occasional Notices of the Civil Affairs of the Province (Toronto: Anson Green, at the Wesleyan Printing Establishment, 1862).

Early Settlers—Watertown, MA

A Map of the Original Allotments of Land and the Ancient Topography of Watertown Proper, compiled and drawn by Henry Bond, M.D. [1]

This map of Watertown, Massachusetts, was brought to our attention in an email newsletter from the New England Historic Genealogical Society. The map shows the original allotments of land for Watertown, first settled in 1630.

In two previous posts, we learned about two of our early settlers of Watertown—John Whitney I and William Shattuck I. But we have more!

On this map, we find the original allotments of land for several of our ancestor families:

  • Arnold
  • Kimball
  • Reynolds
  • Sawtel [Sawtell]
  • Shattuck
  • Tarball [Tarbell]
  • Whitney

To the lower left, we find Whitney’s Hill.

The family name How appears on several of the lots, perhaps related to our Howes of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts, although none of our Howes are known to have been in Watertown.


Richard Kimball (1596–1675) and Ursula Scott (1597–1661) are 11th great-grandparents of MKS in the Watne branch.

Jonathan Sawtell (1639–1690) and Mary Tarbell (1645–1676) are 9th great-grandparents of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Richard Sawtell (1611–1694) and Elizabeth Pople (1611–1694) are 10th great-grandparents of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

William Shattuck I (1661–1672) and Susanna NN (1620–1686) are 11th great-grandparents of MKS in the Watne branch.

John Whitney I (1588–1673) and Eleanor Arnold (1599–1659) are 10th great-grandparents of MKS in the Wetherbee branch, and 12th great-grandparents of MKS in the Watne branch.

John Whitney II (1621–1692) and Ruth Reynolds (1623–1662) are 11th great-grandparents of MKS in the Watne branch.

References:
[1] Digital Commonwealth, Massachusetts Collections Online.