Say Anything …

“Shall we never, never get rid of this Past?” cried he, keeping up the earnest tone of his preceding conversation. “It lies upon the Present like a giant’s dead body!”

—Holgrave, The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Photo Friday—Charles and Sarah Clewett Tablet

Charles Felix Clewett and Sarah Churly Clewett tablet; West Norwood Cemetery and Crematorium; West Norwood, Lambeth, Greater London, England.

During a recent trip to London, L. Wetherbee went to the West Norwood Cemetery and Crematorium to visit the gravesite of Elizabeth Ann Clewett, 4th great-grandmother of MKS. Unfortunately, the gravesite does not appear to have a marker for her. There is, however, a marker for one of her twelve children—Charles Felix Clewett, and his wife Sarah Robina Churly Clewett.

The below record, found at the cemetery, lists the family members interred in Section 20, plot 14942:

  • Charles F. Clewett—son of Charles Felix and wife Sarah
  • James Clewett—son of Elizabeth Ann
  • Charles Felix Clewett—son of Elizabeth Ann
  • Elizabeth Ann Clewett
  • Sarah Clewett—wife of Charles Felix
Charles Felix Clewett plot entries; West Norwood Cemetery and Crematorium; Section 20, Plot 14942.

Charles Felix purchased the plot on 15 Aug 1874 upon the death of his child Charles F. at age 3.

This record helped us resolve the children of Edwin and Elizabeth Ann Clewett.

Baptism records list an Edwin and Elizabeth Clewett with four children—Margaret Ann, Mary Ann, Emily Ann, and Charles Felix—born between 1831 and 1837.

The 1851 and 1861 England Census list an Edwin and Elizabeth Clewett with eight children—Edwin, George, Elizabeth, James, Emma, Charlotte, Caroline, and John—born between 1840 and 1855.

Previously, we had not found anything to connect these two sets of records as being the same family. This cemetery record, listing Charles Felix and James, does that. And, it inspired us to dig deeper.

We then found three other records for further confirmation. Elizabeth P. is found living with sister Mary Ann in the 1861 England Census. Charles Felix and James have children baptized on the same day at the same church in 1873. George’s 1908 record in the England & Wales, National Probate Calendar, lists brother Charles Felix.

It appears some of the children worked as servants for other families—Mary Ann, age 17, in the 1851 England Census; Emma, age 13, in the 1861 England Census.

Interestingly, Margaret Ann and Mary Ann married brothers—Henry William Stanley and Robert Stanley, respectively. Of the twelve children, it appears only Mary Ann immigrated to the United States.


Edwin Clewett (1809-1858) and Elizabeth Ann Agg Wain (1809-1891) are 4th great-grandparents of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Charles Felix Clewett I (1837-1888) and James Clewett (1846-1875) are 4th great-uncles of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Sarah Robina Churly (1843-1895) is wife of Charles Felix Clewett I.

Charles Felix Clewett II (1871-1874) is son of Charles Felix Clewett I and Sarah Robina Churly, and 1st cousin 4x removed of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

OTDIH—Olympic Champion Ethel Hannah Catherwood

Ethel Catherwood, the “Saskatoon Lily”, 1928 Summer Olympics.

On this day in history, 5 Aug 1928, Ethel Hannah Catherwood won the gold medal for the high jump in the 1928 Summer Olympics.

Two years earlier, on 6 Sep 1926 at an event in Canada, Ethel had set the high jump world record of 1.58 meters. That record was broken on 3 Jul 1928 by the Dutch high jumper Lien Gisolf with a jump of 1.582 meters. [1]

On the final day of the 1928 Summer Olympics, Ethel set the new world record with her final jump of 1.595 meters. [1] With this jump, Ethel held the Canadian record for the next quarter century.

The Canadian high jumper Ethel Catherwood in action, 1928 Summer Olympics.

Ethel’s accomplishment is notable in several ways. The 1928 Summer Olympics was the first time women were allowed to participate at the Olympics. Hers was the first ever gold medal awarded to a female high jumper. And Ethel is still the only Canadian woman to win a gold medal in an individual track and field event at the Olympics.

The 1928 Canadian Olympic team heading off to forge their place in sports history. Ethel Catherwood is the tallest woman, center of photo.

Ethel was born on 28 Apr 1908 in Hannah, North Dakota, the daughter of Joseph Catherwood and Ethel Jane Hannah. The family moved to Scott, Battleford District, Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1910. One of nine children, Ethel was a natural athlete, playing baseball, basketball, and hockey. She began to high jump before she was ten years old, and was soon jumping heights rivaling the world’s best jumpers.

After the Olympics, Ethel returned to Saskatoon, Canada, an international sensation. However, she soon withdrew from public life after her private life was sensationalized by the press [2]. She married and moved to California, where she died in 1987.

Ethel was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame (1949), Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame (1955), and the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame (1966).

Canada Postage Stamp, Sporting Heroes series, Ethel Catherwood, High Jump, 1928 Summer Olympics.

Ethel Hannah Catherwood (1908-1987) is 2nd cousin 3x removed of MKS in the Watne branch.

References: 
[1] Athletics at the 1928 Summer Olympics—Women’s high jump.
[2] Saskatoon Lily: record-breaker, scandal-maker.