Photo Friday—Edgar and Annie Chapman

Edger Chapman and Annie Veazey Chapman.

Edgar Chapman and Annie Veazey were born in Powellton, Hancock County, Georgia, and married on 22 Dec 1889 in Taliaferro County, Georgia. They had 10 children.

They resided in Hancock County, removed to Warren County, Georgia, bef. 1900, and returned to Hancock County bef. 1920 where they resided until their deaths. They are both interred at the Powellton Community Cemetery.


Edgar Clarence Chapman (1867-1949) and Annie Laura Vezey (1871-1954) are 3rd great-grandparents of MKS in the Knight branch.

Source: Ancestry.com user SJDavisIV (photograph).

Say Anything …

For there is no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a man: also, it may be said, there is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed.

Sir Walker Scott

Photo Friday—Elisabeth, Grace, and Rachel Martin

Tinted lithograph entitled “Elisabeth, Grace, and Rachel Martin”, Claude Régnier (Lithographer), Felix Octavius Carr Darley (Artitst), 1853. [1]

This dramatic print depicts sisters-in-law Grace and Rachel Martin disguised in their husbands’ clothing successfully intercepting at gunpoint a dispatch intended for British troops near their South Carolina home. The two women then brought the stolen information to the American forces. When the intercepted British troops later sought refuge in the Martin homestead, the women’s mother-in-law Elizabeth Martin successfully diverted the soldiers’ attention away from Grace and Rachel. Author Elizabeth Ellett related the exploits of the three women in the first volume of Women of the American Revolution (New York, 1848).

In Disguise: Cross Dressing and Gender Identity, Women Soldiers [2]

Read about their daring exploit in Elizabeth Ellett’s Women of the American Revolution [3].


Elizabeth Marshall (1727-1797) is 8th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Grace Waring (1758-20) is 7th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Rachel Clay (1763-1840) is wife of 8th great-uncle of MKS in the Knight branch.

Reference:
[1] Elisabeth, Grace and Rachel Martin, Lithograph, Claude Régnier (Lithographer), Felix Octavius Carr Darley (Artist), 1853.
[2] In Disguise: Cross Dressing and Gender Identity, Women Soldiers, Library Company of Philadelphia.
[3] The Women of the American Revolution, Volume I, Chapter XXI, by Elizabeth F. Ellet, Baker and Scribner, New York, 1850.

Photo Friday—Ernest Joiner

Earnest Lee Joiner I and unknown child.

­Ernest was born in Georgia, perhaps Mitchell County, the son of Asa Bryant Joiner and Susan Ellen Davis Joiner, and was raised there.

In the 1900 US Census, he is listed as living with his parents in Branchville, Mitchell County, Georgia, and his occupation is listed as farm laborer.

In the 1920 US Census, he is listed as living with his family in Sylvester City, Worth County, Georgia, and his occupation is listed as a laborer in an oil mill. From his Sep 1918 World War I Draft Registration Card, we know that he was working for the Planters Oil Company in Sylvester, manufacturing cotton seed oil. It also tells us that his eyes are blue.

He married Sarah Jane Alderman some time before his draft registration.

Before 1931, his family removed to Miami, Dade County, Florida. It appears that his parents also removed there with them. In 1931, he is working for the Seminole Drug Company.

In the 1940 US Census, he is listed as living with his wife in Miami Springs, Dade, County, Florida, and his occupation is listed as merchant working on his own account.

He was living in Miami Springs when he died in 1964.


Ernest Lee Joiner I (1883-1964) is 1st cousin 4x removed of MKS in the Knight branch.

Source: KMS Family Genealogy Digital Archive, Jacqueline Anne Knight Spratlin collection (photograph).

2019 Resolutions

In 2019, we have resolved to:

  • Write more family stories.
  • Make it easier to find photos on the site.
  • Find Alpheus Adams’ maternal line.
  • Actually work on the Norwegian lines in the tree—our patience dealing with the Norwegian name thing is unfortunately very low.
  • Take at least one trip to research a brick wall in the tree—Ireland and Virginia are on the short list.

Photo Galleries are now live on the site. Look under the menu Our Genealogy > Photos. There, you will find:

  • Galleries—photos sorted by family branch and various other themes
  • Tag Cloud—click on a word and a gallery is created with the associated photos

One down, four to go!

Photo Friday—Levi Knight I

Levi Jackson Knight I.

­Levi was born in Ray’s Mill, Berrien County, Georgia, the son of Henry and Mary Knight, and was raised there.

In the 1910 US Census, he is listed as a boarder in Lowndes County, Georgia, and his occupation is listed as clerk at a drug store.

In the 1920 US Census, he is listed as living with his family in Macon, Bibb County, Georgia, and his occupation is listed as druggist in the wholesale drug industry.

Before 1938, he removed to Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, and was still living there in 1953. He was living in Midville, Burke County, Georgia, when he died in 1968.

He was married twice, first to Lila Mae Joiner. After Lila Mae’s death in 1949, he married Emily Jay.


Levi Jackson Knight I (1894-1968) is 2nd great-grandfather of MKS in the Knight branch.

Source: KMS Family Genealogy Digital Archive, Jacqueline Anne Knight Spratlin collection (photograph).

OTDIH—Christmas Day at Fort Clatsop

­On this day in history, 25 Dec 1805, Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery spent Christmas Day at Fort Clatsop in the Pacific Northwest.

At first light on Christmas morning, 1805, the men woke the captains with a volley, a shout, and a song. They exchanged presents—Private Whitehouse gave Captain Clark a pair of moccasins he had made, Private Silas Goodrich gave him a woven basket, Sacagawea give him two dozen white weasel tails, and Captain Lewis gave him a vest, drawers, and socks. The captains divided the small quantity of tobacco they had left, keeping one part for use with the Indians and dividing the other among the men who smoked. The eight non-smokers each got a handkerchief.

The celebration didn’t last long. It was a wet and disagreeable day, and, as Clark recorded, ‘We would have Spent this day the nativity of Christ in feasting, had we any thing either to raise our Sperits or even gratify our appetites, our Diner concisted of pore Elk, So much Spoiled that we eate it thro’ mear necessity, Some Spoiled pounded fish and a few roots.’

Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West, by Stephen E. Ambrose, 1996.
Fort Clatsop replica built in 2007, near Astoria, Clatsop County, Oregon.

After successfully reaching the Pacific Ocean on 20 Nov 1805, the Corps of Discovery established their winter camp, Fort Clatsop, on 7 Dec 1805 near present day Astoria, Clatsop County, Oregon.


­CPT Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) is 3rd cousin 9x removed of MKS in the Knight branch.