Dr. William Henry Tutt, ARC Hall of Fame, 2019-2020

The Academy of Richmond County inducted Dr. William Henry Tutt into its Hall of Fame on 17 Oct 2019.

Dr. William Henry Tutt. [1]

His induction biography reads [2]:

Born in Augusta, August 31, 1823, Dr. William Henry Tutt became a name recognized throughout the country as the Physician who created several medicines, that in the nineteenth century were believed to have beneficial effects, including the best known Tutt’s Liver Pills. A graduate of the Medical College of Georgia, Tutt practiced medicine for a number of years. At this time, many Physicians were also Pharmacists. Tutt decided to become a merchant/manufacturer of patent medicines. The first advertisement for Tutt as a wholesale and retail druggist appeared in the Augusta Chronicle in April 1845. Two years later, he was appointed to the Board of Health by the Mayor and would continue to be active in the community in many ways, including several years on the City Council. In 1847, he married Harriet Remson Beall of Lincoln County. They had four daughters and two sons. In June 1860, he announced that he had given his interest in the drug store in Augusta to his brother B. F. Tutt. He moved with his family to New York to expand his wholesale drug business there. Unfortunately, the Civil War began only months after the family’s arrival and while William was able to get passes for his family to return South, he was delayed. Historian Edward Cashin explained, he basically escaped from the North by getting passage to Bermuda, then through the blockade, and finally overland to Augusta. By 1863, he was once again advertising a drug store in the newspaper. After the war, Tutt devised a plan to expand the Augusta canal. Although it did not happen until after he left the city again, he was correct that a larger canal would boost manufacturing and the economic growth of the city.

In 1872, the Tutt family returned to New York again to manufacture medicines, this time staying over fifteen years. He remained in New York until 1888, becoming quite wealthy in the process. He returned to Augusta in 1888 and began to invest some of that wealth for the development of the city. One of the backers and promoters of the Augusta National Exposition that fall, Tutt believed that Augusta could attract wealthy Northerners to the city in the cold months of winter. He bought acreage from the Anne McKinne Winter estate and built the Grand Bon Air Hotel sitting atop the Hill. His vision of Augusta, as winter destination, became a reality for the next four decades. It brought some of the country’s most successful industrialists and politicians of the late nineteenth century for several months each year to the community. The Bon Air introduced golf to the city. This winter colony was an economic and cultural boon to Augusta’s economy. When William Tutt died March 15, 1898, he was a Revered Citizen of the Augusta Community.

The Academy of Richmond County Hall of Fame biography
Dr. Willliam H. Tutt’s Golden Eagle Bitters bottle. [3]

Chartered in 1783 in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, the Academy of Richmond County is the fifth oldest existing public high school in the United States. [4]

William Henry Tutt I (1823-1898) is 1st cousin 6x removed of MKS in the Knight branch.

References:
[1] Men of Mark in Georgia, Volume III, edited by William J. Northen, 1911.
[2] ARC Hall of Fame, 2019-2020.
[3] Photo courtesy of Mike Newman, © 2019 Mike Newman.
[4] Academy of Richmond County, wikipedia.org.

Knight, Georgia, and the Ray City History Blog

Knight, Georgia. Johnson’s Georgia and Alabama, 1862. [1]

“About 1827, Levi J. Knight and his new bride Ann Clements Herrin homesteaded on land on Beaverdam Creek, near the present day site of Ray City, Georgia. … The Knight homestead was situated in Lowndes County (present day Berrien County).” [2]

Look in the middle of the map [1], just below the city of Nashville, Berrien County, Georgia. Apparently the renown of Levi J. Knight as first settler of the area and as Major General of the 6th Division of the Georgia Militia earned his community a place on the map in 1862 as Knight, Georgia.

The small community is later known as Knight’s Mill (1867), Ray’s Mill (1879), and Ray City (1909).

Our Knight family plays a prominent role in the history of Ray City. Learn more at the excellent Ray City History Blog.


Levi J. Knight (1803-1870) and Ann Donald Clements (1802-1857) are 5th great-grandparents of MKS in the Knight branch.

References:
[1] Johnson’s Georgia and Alabama, by Alvin Jewett Johnson and Benjamin P. Ward, 1862.
[2] Levi J. Knight ~ Settling Lowndes County 1827-1836, Ray City History Blog, 6 Jun 2013.

Priscilla Sanders Will

Priscilla Farrar will, 20 Aug 1807.

This is the last will and testament of Priscilla Farrar, dated 20 Aug 1807. Her original will was recorded in Will Book “B”, Page 25, in Oglethorpe County, Georgia, on 8 Nov 1808. She probably died just before Nov 1808.

She was born in 1729 at Farrar’s Island, Henrico County, Virginia, the daughter of George Farrar and Judith Jefferson. Priscilla married Henry Howard on 4 May 1762 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. After Henry died in 1796, she married Adams Sanders some time after 2 Nov 1798, probably in Person County, North Carolina.

She wills $30 to her son Robert Howard, and that the remainder of her estate be equally divided among those listed below, after deducting debts due to her estate by her sons Hiram ($80) and Abel ($100) Howard:

  • Hiram Howard, son
  • John Howard, son
  • James Patterson, son-in-law by her daughter Margaret Howard
  • Thomas Key (Howard), grandson by her deceased son William H. Howard)
  • Abel Howard, son
  • Groves Howard, son
  • Thomas Chambers, son-in-law by her daughter Devina Howard
  • William Carter, probably son-in-law by her daughter Mary Howard
  • Henry William Howard, son

She appointed her son Groves Howard, and Clement Glenn as executors. The will was witnessed and later proved by Nicholas L. Meriwether and George Gilmer.


Priscilla Farrar (1729-1808) is 7th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Judith Jefferson (1698-1786) is 8th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch, and paternal aunt of President Thomas Jefferson.

Nicholas Lewis Meriwether is the brother of Lucy Meriwether, wife of Groves Howard. Nicholas and Lucy are 1st cousins of Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Nicholas Meriwether, Lucy Meriwether, and Meriwether Lewis are also 3rd cousin 9x removed of MKS in the Knight branch.

Nathan Chapman Family Bible

Nathan Chapman (1777-1868) family bible.

This is page 1 of the Nathan Chapman family bible, listing Nathan, his wife Elizabeth, and their 10 children.

Nathan was born in Virginia in 1777. He removed with his father to South Carolina during the Revolutionary War, and then to Georgia in 1790.

On 20 Feb 1800, Nathan married Elizabeth Hart, who was born in North Carolina. Nathan’s brothers Benjamin and Thomas both married sisters of Elizabeth.

Nathan and his family lived in Wilkes County, Georgia (before 1803), and Taliaferro County, Georgia (before 1827).

In the 1860 US Census, Nathan and Elizabeth are still living in Taliaferro County. Nathan is listed as a farmer, and his real estate and personal estate are valued at $2,500 and $7,630 respectively.

As most of the writing on this page of the family bible appears to have been done at the same time (note the similarity in handwriting style, ink density and line thickness), this is a derivative source, and we must treat all of this information as secondary information as we do not know who wrote it and when.


Nathan Chapman (1777-1868) and Elizabeth Hart (1780-1863) are 6th great-grandparents of MKS in the Knight branch.

Source: Ancestry.com user tpeach1891919 (document).

Photo Friday—Susie Sumner

Susie Chapman Sumner (left) and KMS, Jul 1962.

This photo is one of several taken during a visit with Archie Williams Chapman, Susie Williams Sumner, and Marion Chapman Knight during Jul 1962. Archie and Susie are sisters. Marion is daughter of Archie.

Susie grew up in White Plains, Greene County, Georgia. She married Charles Sumner in May 1913, and they resided in Greenville, South Carolina. After his death in 1952, she resided in Charlotte, North Carolina. They had one daughter, Frances Catron Sumner Roland.


Archie June Williams (1890-1965) is 2nd great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Susie Elizabeth Williams (1887-1974) is 3rd great-aunt of MKS in the Knight branch.

Marion Elizabeth Chapman (1971-1963) is great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Say Anything …

“Shall we never, never get rid of this Past?” cried he, keeping up the earnest tone of his preceding conversation. “It lies upon the Present like a giant’s dead body!”

—Holgrave, The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Photo Friday—Edgar and Annie Chapman

Edger Chapman and Annie Veazey Chapman.

Edgar Chapman and Annie Veazey were born in Powellton, Hancock County, Georgia, and married on 22 Dec 1889 in Taliaferro County, Georgia. They had 10 children.

They resided in Hancock County, removed to Warren County, Georgia, bef. 1900, and returned to Hancock County bef. 1920 where they resided until their deaths. They are both interred at the Powellton Community Cemetery.


Edgar Clarence Chapman (1867-1949) and Annie Laura Vezey (1871-1954) are 3rd great-grandparents of MKS in the Knight branch.

Source: Ancestry.com user SJDavisIV (photograph).

Say Anything …

For there is no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a man: also, it may be said, there is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed.

—Sir Walker Scott

Photo Friday—Elisabeth, Grace, and Rachel Martin

Tinted lithograph entitled “Elisabeth, Grace, and Rachel Martin”, Claude Régnier (Lithographer), Felix Octavius Carr Darley (Artitst), 1853. [1]

This dramatic print depicts sisters-in-law Grace and Rachel Martin disguised in their husbands’ clothing successfully intercepting at gunpoint a dispatch intended for British troops near their South Carolina home. The two women then brought the stolen information to the American forces. When the intercepted British troops later sought refuge in the Martin homestead, the women’s mother-in-law Elizabeth Martin successfully diverted the soldiers’ attention away from Grace and Rachel. Author Elizabeth Ellett related the exploits of the three women in the first volume of Women of the American Revolution (New York, 1848).

In Disguise: Cross Dressing and Gender Identity, Women Soldiers [2]

Read about their daring exploit in Elizabeth Ellett’s Women of the American Revolution [3].


Elizabeth Marshall (1727-1797) is 8th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Grace Waring (1758-20) is 7th great-grandmother of MKS in the Knight branch.

Rachel Clay (1763-1840) is wife of 8th great-uncle of MKS in the Knight branch.

Reference:
[1] Elisabeth, Grace and Rachel Martin, Lithograph, Claude Régnier (Lithographer), Felix Octavius Carr Darley (Artist), 1853.
[2] In Disguise: Cross Dressing and Gender Identity, Women Soldiers, Library Company of Philadelphia.
[3] The Women of the American Revolution, Volume I, Chapter XXI, by Elizabeth F. Ellet, Baker and Scribner, New York, 1850.