CPT Peter Knight’s Command of Colonial Fort

Virginia Highway Marker E-70. [1]

On 21 Sep 1674, the Grand Assembly, held at James City, Virginia, enacted Act I – An act for the safeguard and defense of the country against the Indians. [2] to defend the northern frontier of the colony against the Susquehannocks and other Indian groups. The act provides for 8 garrisons and specifies the number of men each county is to provide. Ammunition, provisions, tools, surgeons, medicines, horses, pay to footmen and horsemen, compensation for families of those slain, and compensation for owners of horses killed are all specified. Rules of engagement and articles, rules and orders to be observed (26 in all) by the men are specified.

Act I specifies that 34 men out of Northumberland County, 25 men out of Lancaster County, and 25 men out of Middlesex County be garrisoned at one fort or place of defense on the Potomac River at or near John Mathew’s land in the county of Stafford (now Fairfax County), of which fort Captain Peter Knight is to be captain or chief commander.

Virginia Historical Highway Marker E-70, Colonial Fort, stands near this site at 38° 46.763′ N, 77° 3.111′ W, next to the George Washington Memorial Parkway in Belle Haven, Virginia. [1]


CPT Peter Knight (1620–1705) is 10th great-grandfather of MKS in the Knight branch.

References:
[1] Virginia Department of Historic Resources, Historical Highway Markers, database search > E-70 > Colonial Fort, Fairfax (County). Virginia Department of Historic Resources, 1999 (photograph).
[2] William Waller Hening (editor), The statutes at large; being a collection of all the laws of Virginia, from the first session of the legislature, in the year 1619; …, Vol II (New York: R. & W. & G. Bartow (printer), 1823), pp326-336; digital images, Hathitrust.org (https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.35112104867892).

James Spratling’s Earmark

Livestock owners in the Colony of Virginia protected their rights to their livestock with earmarks, shapes cut into the animal’s ears. Earmarks were preferred there in the 17th century over branding. [1]

These earmarks were recorded in the county court to help in the return of stray livestock, or litigation over stolen livestock.

Our James Spratling recorded his earmark with the County Court of Lunenburg County, Colony of Virginia, on 4 Nov 1760. [2]

James Spratling’s earmark, 1760.

His earmark is described as “a Crop and Slit in the Right Ear, and a Swallow fork in the Left.”

These same earmarks are still in use today. [3]

James removed from Lunenburg County to Henry County, Virgina, before 1777. On 25 Nov 1779, he recorded a different earmark with the Court there [4]—it is difficult to read, but appears to say: “Under Kut in each Earr.”


James Spratling (1742–1812) is 6th great-grandfather of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

References:
[1] Virginia DeJohn Anderson, “Animals into the Wilderness: The Development of Livestock Husbandry in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake,” The William and Mary Quarterly, vol. 59, no. 2, 2002, pp377–408; digital images, JSTOR (https://www.jstor.org/stable/3491742).
[2] County Court, Lunenburg County, Virginia, County Court order books, 1746-1865, Order books, 1759-1762; database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-T9J3-6?i=235&cat=398428), image 236, verso.
[3] Arizona Department of Agriculture, Registered Brands, 2021, p5; digital images (http://searchagriculture.az.gov/docs/brandbook.pdf).
[4} Henry County, Virginia, Order and Minute Books, 1777-1904, General Indexes, 1777–1904, Order Books, v. 1-6 1777–1797; database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-PXSG?cat=400740), image 61, recto.

Spratling with a “T”

Conventional wisdom assures us James Spratling (1742–1812), husband of Winifred Munday, is the son of John Spradlin (1712–1769) and Mary English (1713–1756). And this conventional wisdom goes on to assure us John is the grandson of Andrew Spradling (1652–1733) of New Kent County, Virginia, apparently Andrew Spradling the Immigrant.

  1. Andrew Spradling (1652–1733) and Ann (Unknown) Spradling (1652–unk)
  2. Andrew Spradling (1689–1738) and Elizabeth (Chaddock) Spradling (1693–1717)
  3. John Spradlin (1712–1769) and Mary English (1713–unk)
  4. James Spratling (1742–1812) and Winifred (Munday) Spratling (1751–1835)

Years ago, this author embraced this conventional wisdom, copying and pasting the line into our family tree. But does the conventional wisdom of 100s of unsourced on-line trees equal truth? A few minutes spent comparing an abstracted source to the primary source and a few Big Y-700 DNA tests have destroyed the conventional wisdom, replacing it with a blank sheet of paper.

The most extensive research of James Spratling and Winifred Munday was conducted by Marion S. Wattenbarger [1] before 1998. Marion’s research focuses on establishing that James’ wife Winifred is Winifred Munday, daughter of James Munday of Caroline County, Virginia. Her well-sourced research is a treasure chest, providing the primary sources for the life of our James Spratling.

But perhaps the most interesting thing about Marion’s research is what is not there—not one word about James’ parents or origin. Marion was the brave genealogist among us. She stuck to what she could prove.

How did James Spratling come to be the son of John Spradlin and Mary English?

Well, an abstract of course! So much easier to read an abstract than the cursive handwriting of the primary source—is cursive writing even taught in schools any more.

Records of Hanover County.
The Small Book, 1734–1735.

Jany., 1773.

Mary English, extor of Jno. Spradlin. Security Michael Gentry, Saml. Gentry.

Abstract of The Small Book, 1734–1735, Records of Hanover County. [2][3]

Our imagination fills in the rest. Mary is John’s wife—ok, that part is not hard to imagine as the wife is often the executor of the husband’s estate in this era. But he needs a birth date. He needs a death date. And throw in a child while we are at it. Or perhaps that came later, John being discovered in the area, with a very unique surname, the right age to be the father of our James, an ancestor in need of parents.

But something is already amiss. Do you see it? Why is a Jany. 1773 record in the 1734–1735 records of Hanover County, Virginia. Well, it isn’t.

In the primary source [4], image 23, left-hand side of the page, we find something very different.

In the record dated 5 Mar 1733 (O.S.), we find the probate for John Spradlin, deceased in 1734, not 1769, whose wife Mary Spradlin is executrix, with Samuel and Nicholas Gentry posting bond.

  • 5 Mar 1733 (O.S.), not Jany., 1773.
  • Mary Spradlin, not Mary English.
  • Nicholas Gentry, not Michael Gentry.

The primary source is clearly referring to John Spradlin (1678–1734) who married Mary Gentry.

Where did Mary English come from? Flip back one page to image 22, right-hand side of the page. There we find the 7 Jul 1727 (O.S.) settlement of the estate of John English, Mary English extor. This record and the record at the top of image 23, left-hand side of the page, are both missing from the abstract.

Mary English is her married name in the primary source. However, in the 100s of unsourced on-line trees, Mary English is her maiden name, and she is the daughter of John and Mary English.

The marriage of John Spradlin (1712–1769) and Mary English is an abstraction error, two records conflated into one. He does not exist.

Not convinced? Want to bet?

Descendants of Andrew Spradling (1652–1733) and James Spratling (1742–1812) have taken Y-DNA tests with FamilyTreeDNA. See the data on the Spradlin Project.

The descendants of Andrew Spradling are haplogroup R-FGC21301. Three descendants of James Spratling, including this author, are haplogroup R-BY67253. These two haplogroups are estimated to share a Most Recent Common Ancestor between 127 and 155 generations ago, between 1600 B.C. and 2400 B.C.

The Spradlings and Spratlings of the Colony of Virginia are not related in either the genealogical or the historical time frame.

The parents of James Spratling are unknown.


James Spratling (1742–1812) and Winifred Munday (1750–1835) are 6th great-grandparents of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

References:
[1] Marion S. Wattenbarger, “James Spratling and His Wife, Winifred (Munday), Caroline and Henry Counties and Wilkes County, Georgia,” Tidewater Virginia Families: A Magazine of History and Genealogy, Virginia Lee Hutcheson David, editor, 12 vol. (Berwyn Heights, Maryland: Heritage Books, Inc., 2016), 6:1 (May 1997 – Feb 1998):30-38.
[2] “Records of Hanover County.”, The William and Mary Quarterly, vol. 21, no. 1, 1912, 49; digital images, JSTOR (https://www.jstor.org/stable/1922081).
[3] Gary Parks (indexer), Virginia Land Records From The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the William and Mary College Quarterly, and Tyler’s Quarterly (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1982), 85; digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/23352612?h=abdcc6).
[4] County Court, Hanover County, Virginia, Deeds, wills inventories, and settlement of estates, 1733–1735, Miscellaneous probate and land records, 1733–1792, Item 1, Deeds, wills, inventories, and settlement of estates 1733-1735; database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99P6-3SFR?cat=365146), image 22-23.

Sourced—Spratlin(g)

We have learned much about our Knight line, and much about the process of genealogy, from Laura Knight Jadczyk. Her website Once a Knight is Enough, Knight Genealogy reflects over two decades of research of her Knight line, back to our shared ancestry in the Knights of Colonial Virginia.

As we climb our tree back through Colonial America, things get murky. Records are sparse. Families were large, and, they, well, they ran out of given names. Jr. was attached to a young adult male to distinguish him from his uncle, so Jr. does not share his given name with his father. The given name of a deceased child was given to a sibling born later. Records were lost, or destroyed—though not as often as we pretend. And they moved a lot.

The life of a relative in that era may now only be reflected in a single reference, in a original record that has not been microfiched, and digitally scanned—it is not on-line.

Laura demonstrates the benefit—no, the necessity—of looking at every record for a surname of interest, and the records of their Allied families, to make headway in Colonial America.

After our recent focus on the Irish lines of our Watne branch—Porter, Gallagher, Walker, Hannah, Virtue—it is time to tackle our direct paternal line, Spratlin(g). As with our Knight line, we are headed back to Colonial Virginia.

Step one, don’t forget what Laura taught us.

Sourced—Spratlin(g)

If you are researching your Spratlin(g) line in Colonial Virginia, join in. We need the help!

17,350 and Counting

The early part of 2020 was devoted to finding Alpheus Adam’s maternal line using a combination of genetic genealogy and old-fashion research into the history of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada and the United States. And 2020 closes as we found possible parents for Andrew Porter Sr. in County Donegal, Ireland.

At the end of 2020, there were 17,350 family members in our family tree.

Milton Spratlin Obituary

Milton Thomas Spratlin, 1965.

Milton Thomas Spratlin, 87, of Toccoa, Georgia, passed away Thursday, November 5, 2020, after several years of declining health. He was born August 13, 1933, in Clarke County, Georgia, to parents Charles Spratlin and Goldie Christian Spratlin.

He graduated from Athens High School in 1950, and graduated with a BBA from the University of Georgia in 1954, receiving an Army Officer commission at that time. He served in the US Army as a Recon Platoon leader in the 61st Tank Battalion, 9th Infantry, in Germany.

After military service, he was first employed by the Georgia Railroad Bank & Trust Company in Augusta, Georgia. In August 1961, he joined the Bank of Toccoa, and served in the positions of Assistant Vice President, Cashier, Executive Vice President, President, and Director. He retired from there in December 1998.

He held leadership positions in many professional and civic organizations including the Stephens County Jaycees, Stephens County Chamber of Commerce, Georgia Bankers Association, Toccoa Housing Authority, City of Toccoa Personnel Advisory Board, Stephens County Board of Tax Accessors, Stephens County United Way Fund, Stephens County Red Cross, Boy Scouts of America, Camp Fire Girls of America, and Stephens County Historical Society. He was a member of the Toccoa First United Methodist Church.

He was married for 46 years to Jacqueline (Jackie) Knight of Augusta, Georgia, and after her death in 2007, he married Darlene Millard, who passed away 5 months later.

He is survived by his sister-in-law Kathryn Cofer Spratlin, wife of brother John; brother-in-law Charles Lester, husband of sister Faye; and friend Maxine Felts.

He is survived by a son, three daughters, their spouses, and their 9 grandchildren: Ken, wife Lisa Wetherbee, and their son Matthew, of Boulder, Colorado; Sandra, sons Richard and Cameron, husband Andy Adams, and sons Drew and Hayden, of Edmond, Oklahoma; Susan, husband Ed Carman, and their son Forrest, of Toccoa; and Cynthia, her husband Dr. Cyril Halbert, and their sons Braeden and Ashton, and daughter Keira, of Las Vegas, Nevada.

He is preceded in death by his sister Evelyn Spratlin Flanagan, and her husband Clarence Flanagan; brother John Spratlin; brother Donald Spratlin; sister Faye Spratlin Smith Lester, and her husband Ferman Smith III.

An outdoor visitation and funeral service will be held at Roselane Cemetery, 1033 Rose Lane, Toccoa, on Sunday November 8, 2020. The visitation is from 2:00-3:45 pm, with the service following at 4:00 pm, the Reverend Brent White and Mr. Brent Ware officiating.

Military Honors will be provided by the United States Army.

The family will have a private burial immediately following the service.

In lieu of flowers, Milton would hope that you will volunteer time or donate to a community civic or youth organization. A donation to the Currahee Military Museum, 160 Alexander St., Toccoa, GA 30577, would support one of his passions.

Milton and Jacqueline Spratlin headstone, Roselane Cemetery, Toccoa, Georgia. [1]

Milton Thomas Spratlin (1933–2020)  is grandfather of MKS in the Spratlin branch.

References:
[1] KMS Family Genealogy Digital Archive, Jacqueline Anne Knight Spratlin collection (photograph).

Say Anything …

By a curious quirk of human nature, rather than Mother Nature, every American family of the surname Washington is related to George, all Adamses are of the family of John Quincy, and all Jeffersons are cousins of Thomas—at least as far as family traditions are concerned.

—Elizabeth Shown Mills, C.G., F.A.S.G.