Marched on the Alarm of 19 Apr 1775—Abner Hosmer

Abner Hosmer was a Private in Captain Isaac Davis’ company of Acton Massachusetts Minutemen, and marched on the alarm of 19 April 1775. Abner was killed instantly in the first volley at the North Bridge in Concord.

Abner is memorialized through the Isaac Davis Monument on the Acton Town Common. The remains of Isaac Davis, Abner, and James Hayward (an Acton soldier killed in Lexington later that day) were moved and re-interred beneath the monument.

He was born in West Acton, the son of Deacon Jonathan Hosmer and Martha Conant Hosmer.

Memento mori
Here lies the
Body of Mr. Abner
Hosmer son of Deacon
Jonathan Hosmer &
Mrs. Martha his wife,
who was Killed in Concord fight
April 19th, 1775 In the
Defense of the just rights
and Liberties of his Country
being in the 21st
year of his age.

Abner Hosmer headstone, Acton Town Common, Acton, Massachusetts.

Abner Hosmer (1754-19 Apr 1775) is the great-uncle of Stephen Hosmer who married Mary Wetherbee, 4th cousin 5x removed of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

References:
[1] “The Minute Men, The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution,” John R. Galvin, Potomoc Books, Inc., 1989.
[2] Wikipedia.com

Marched on the Alarm of 19 Apr 1775—Isaac Davis

Captain Isaac Davis and his Acton Massachusetts company of Minutemen marched on the alarm of 19 Apr 1775. “When Davis, characteristically, volunteered to lead the march” down the hill at the North Bridge at Concord to face the British Regulars, Major “Buttrick placed him in the van where his marksmen with their solid line of bayonets could be more effective.”

“A gunsmith by trade, he had taken care that all his men were well armed; every man in the company had a good musket, a bayonet, cartridge box, canteen—this was one of the many provincial companies to be complete in accouterments. The men under Davis were good shots, too. Davis had built a firing range out behind his house, where twice a week from November to April he had led his men in firing and drill. Needless to say, the fighting spirit of Isaac Davis rubbed off on his men. His own weapon, a product of his shop, was perhaps the best musket on the field that day.

“Davis was no hothead, but a man of quiet conviction. His wife, many years later, recalled as a very old woman the man she had known in her youth, on the day of the battle: “My husband said but little that morning. He seemed serious and thoughtful; but never seemed to hesitate as to the course of his duty. As he led the company from the house, he turned himself round, and seemed to have something to communicate. He only said, ‘Take good care of the children,’ and was soon out of sight.”

Davis, age 30, was killed in the first volley, along with “one of his men, Abner Hosmer. Both were killed instantly; two or three others were wounded.” Davis was the first American officer killed in the Revolution.

The Minute Man, 1875, Statue by Daniel Chester French, Old North Bridge, Concord, Massachusetts.

Davis is the inspiration behind The Minute Man, the statue by Daniel Chester French, unveiled on 19 Apr 1875 at the Old North Bridge. The statue was modeled after Davis using photographs of Davis’ descendants.

Davis is also memorialized through the Isaac Davis Monument on the Acton Town Common. The remains of Davis, Abner Hosmer, and James Hayward (an Acton soldier killed in Lexington later that day) were moved and re-interred beneath the monument.

He was born in West Acton, and married Hannah Brown on 24 Oct 1764. They had four children—two boys and two girls.

I Say Unto All Watch.
In Memory of Capt. Isaac Davis
who was Slain in battle at 
Concord April ye 19th 1775 in
the Defence of ye just rights
and Liberties of his Country
Civil & Religious. He was a loving
Husband a tender Father & a
Kind Neighbour an Ingenious
Craftsman & Serviceable to
Mankind died in ye prime of
life Aged 30 Years 1 m & 25 days.
Is there not an appointed time to man
upon ye earth? Are not his days also like
the days of an hireling?
As the cloud is consumed and vanisheth
away, so he that goeth down to the grave
shall come up no more.
He shall return no more to his house,
neither shall his place know him any
more. Job VII ver 1, 9, 10.

Captain Isaac Davis headstone, Acton Town Common, Acton, Massachusetts.

Isaac Davis’ (1745-19 Apr 1775) sister married Silas Taylor, uncle of Levi Wetherbee II, 3rd cousin 7x removed of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

References:
[1] “The Minute Men, The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution,” John R. Galvin, Potomoc Books, Inc., 1989.
[2] Wikipedia.com

Marched on the Alarm of 19 Apr 1775—Luther Blanchard

Luther Blanchard was a Private and the fifer in Captain Isaac Davis’ company of Acton Massachusetts Minutemen, and marched on the alarm of 19 April 1775. Luther was the first hit by a British bullet at the North Bridge in Concord, wounded in the neck and side. Despite his wounds, Luther joined the pursuers as the British retreated to Charlestown.

Luther was born in Boxborough, in that portion which was formerly a part of Littleton, the son of Simon Blanchard and Sara Fales Blanchard. He had left home to learn the mason’s trade, and was living with Deacon Jonathan Hosmer in West Acton on 19 Apr 1775.

Five days later, 24 April 1775, Luther enlisted in the Army, is listed on the pay roll of Captain William Smith’s company on 7 July 1775, and is listed as a Corporal on the muster roll on 1 Aug 1775. Luther is reported deceased on the company return on 30 Sep 1775. His brother Calvin stated that Luther died of his wounds received at Concord.

Luther is believed buried in an unmarked grave in the Old Burying Ground, Littleton, Massachusetts.

Luther Blanchard
Born in Littleton, June 4, 1756.
Fifer of the Acton Minute Men and
the first man hit by a British
bullet at the North Bridge, Concord
April 19, 1775.
On the muster rolls of the
Continental Army reported dead
September 30, 1775.

Luther Blanchard cenotaph, Old Burying Ground, Littleton, Massachusetts.

He is also memorialized on the town seal of Boxborough, Massachusetts.

Town seal of Boxborough, Massachusetts.

Luther Blanchard (1756-19 Apr 1775) is the great-uncle of Caroline Blanchard who married Simeon Wetherbee II, half 5th cousin 5x removed of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Source: findagrave.com user Denise (photograph).

Marched on the Alarm of 19 Apr 1775

Minute Men Leaving the Home of Captain Isaac Davis, 19 April 1775, by Arthur Fuller Davis.

On this Patriots’ Day Weekend, we remember these family members that marched on the Alarm of 19 Apr 1775, the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Acton, Massachusetts
Luther Blanchard **
Ezekiel Davis II
Isaac Davis *
Abner Hosmer *

Ashburnham, Massachusetts
Ephraim Wetherbee
Phineas Wetherbee II

Bolton, Massachusetts
John Whitcomb

Concord, Massachusetts
Amos Hosmer

Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Paul Wetherbee II

Harvard, Massachusetts
Jonathan Crouch II
Timothy Crouch
Oliver Mead I
Joseph Wetherbee I
Oliver Wetherbee
Abel Whitcomb I

Lancaster, Massachusetts
Asa Whitcomb

Leominster, Massachusetts
Nathaniel Chapman
Littleton, Massachusetts
Joseph Lawrence
Samuel Lawrence II
Thomas Lawrence
Daniel Whitcomb
Isaac Whitcomb
Jonathan Whitcomb V
Silas Whitcomb

Lunenburg, Massachusetts
Thomas Wetherbee I

Rutland, Massachusetts
Samuel Ames

Stow, Massachusetts
Nehemiah Batcheldor
Ephraim Taylor
Oliver Taylor I
Phineas Taylor II
Solomon Taylor
Joseph Wetherbee
Judah Wetherbee
Silas Wetherbee
Thomas Wetherbee II
Reuben Wetherby
William Whitcomb

Westford, Massachusetts
Calvin Blanchard


* shot and killed in action at Battle of Concord.
** wounded in action at Battle of Concord; died of wounds later.

The service records for each, most found in [1], are summarized in this report.


All are in the Wetherbee branch, except Samuel Ames in the Watne Branch.

Reference:
[1] Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War, 1902. This 17 volume set is available on archive.org and openlibrary.org.

Source: Arthur Fuller Davis Gallery, Acton Memorial Library (painting).

Photo Friday—John Wetherby Probate Inventory

John Wetherby probate inventory, 21 Mar 1710/11.

John Wetherby made his will on 13 Oct 1707, modified it on 1 Apr 1709, and it was proved on 2 Apr 1711 in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. In the probate records we find this inventory of his estate as appraised by Jacob Stephens (or Stevens), John Taylor, and Thomas Brown.

John’s will bequeaths his dwelling and land to his second wife Lydia Moore and son David, other land to his sons Jonathan and Ephraim, and money to his daughters Mary, Lydia, and Anne.

John also bequeaths money to his eldest sons Joseph, John, and Thomas—from his first marriage to Mary Howe, deceased— who have previously received something which is not listed but is perhaps land.

£318.3.8 (318 pounds, 3 shillings, and 8 pence) is approximately $49,000 today.


John Wetherby (1642-1711) is 9th great-grandfather of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Source: Ancestry.com, Massachusetts, Wills and Probate Records, 1635-1991, Case Number 24167.

Say Anything …

For there is no heroic poem in the world but is at bottom a biography, the life of a man: also, it may be said, there is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed.

Sir Walker Scott

Photo Friday—Amund and Bertha Olson

Amund Olson and Bertha Marie Tonnesdatter Olson.

Here is a great picture of Amund and Bertha, courtesy of Ancestry.com user David Pollock.


Amund Olson (1840-1915) is 3rd great-grandfather of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Bertha Marie Tonnesdatter (1837-1904) is 3rd great-grandmother of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Source: Ancestry.com user David Pollock (photograph).

Photo Friday—Four Sisters

The Olson Sisters—front row, left to right: Bertelle Olson Stai, Pearl Olson Nansen; back row, left to right: Alta Olson Anderson, Mildred Olson Wetherbee; Sep 1993.

Bertelle, Alta, Mildred, and Pearl are the daughters of Bartemus and Anna Olson. They were born and raised in Murray County and Norman County, North Dakota.

This photograph was taken in Sep 1993, the year of Alta’s 85th birthday.

They have a fifth sister, Ruth, who passed away in 1940, and two brothers, Allan and Merrill.


Bertelle Marguerite Olson (1901-1997) is 2nd great-aunt of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Pearl Josephine Olson (1903-2006) is 2nd great-aunt of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Mildred Evelyn Olson (1906-2001) is great-grandmother of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Alta Valentine Olson (1908-2007) is 2nd great-aunt of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Ruth Frances Olson (1909-1940) is 2nd great-aunt of MKS in the Wetherbee branch.

Source: KMS Family Genealogy Digital Archive, Joyce Elaine Wetherbee Johnson collection (photograph).